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Recipes

Baja Style Fish Tacos w/Spicy Cabbage Slaw
Main Ingredients: cabbage, radish, garlic, chipotle chili pepper,

1 lb. flaky white fish, such as catfish, halibut, or tilapia
4 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
3 Tbsp fresh orange juice
FOR SLAW--Betty Jo's Gourmet Slaw in hot or mild or make your own...
2 1/2 cups cabbage
1/4 rice wine vinegar
3 tbsp olive oil
Juice of one lime
1 tsp dijon mustard
1 chipotle chile in adobo, finely chopped
FOR SALSA
1 mango
5 radishes
2 garlic cloves
1 bunch cilantro
1 lime
10 to 12 corn tortillas
Prepare the fish marinade by combining the fresh lime juice, orange juice, salt, and pepper with the vegetable oil in a rectangular glass or ceramic dish.
Add the fish, turn to coat, and leave to marinate while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

FOR SLAW--Tiffani recommends using Betty Jo's Slaw (available 7 days/week at Wild & Local inside The Market House) or make your own...
Prepare the slaw sauce by shredding cabbage into a large bowl, then combine, olive oil, lime juice, rice wine vinegar, dijon mustard, salt, pepper, and chipotle chile, in a bowl. Toss ingredients together, cover and leave in the refrigerator allowing the flavors to come together.

FOR SALSA
Combine diced mango, chopped radishes, minced garlic, cilantro, and lime juice in a food processor, pulse until chunky.

Remove fish from the marinade and grill or sauté until cooked through. Warm the tortillas (see Note). Set out individual bowls of the sauce, salsa, and shredded cabbage.
For each individual taco, place some of the fish (breaking off chunks of the cooked fillets) on a tortilla, top with slaw and mango salsa.

Chef Tiffani Rozier @Sam & Ralph Culinary Concepts


Buttery Cabbage & Carrots
Main Ingredients: carrots, cabbage
3 tablespoons butter
1 onion
1/2 cabbage
4 carrots
salt to taste
1 tablespoon lemon juice
This recipe can be made vegan/vegetarian by replacing the butter with a similar ingredient.

Chop vegetables to a size of your liking. In wok or other similar pan melt butter over medium high heat. Add onion & cook for 2 minutes. Add remaining ingredients except lemon. Cover & cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the lemon.

Nashville Farmers Market


Cabbage and Carrot Slaw
Main Ingredients: cabbage, carrots, green onions, white wine vinegar, garlic, cumin, oregano, dry mustard,
2 cups finely shredded cabbage (mixture of red and green)
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup sliced green onions
1/3 cup white wine vinegar
3 tablespoons sugar
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1/8-teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon dry mustard
sea salt and pepper to taste
Combine cabbage, carrots and green onions in a large bowl. In a small bowl, mix together vinegar, sugar, garlic, cumin, oregano and mustard just until sugar is dissolved. Pour over the vegetables and chill for at least 4 hours before serving. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds or chopped roasted peanuts. Or, toss with shredded roasted chicken and serve it as the main course.

Roben Mounger, Columbia, TN


Fresh Cabbage & Tomato Salad
Main Ingredients: cabbage, tomatoes, radishes,
1 head small cabbage, sliced thinly
2 medium tomatoes, cut in cubes
1 cup radishes, sliced
1/4 tsp salt
2 tsp olive oil
2tbspn rice vinegar or lemon juice
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp red pepper
2 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped (optional)
Instructions

1. In large blowl, mix together cabbage, tomatoes, and radishes.
2. In another bowl, mix together the rest of the ingredients and pour over vegetables.

Grow Local Kitchen


Garlic Shrimp w/Carrot, Dill & Fennel Slaw
Main Ingredients: fenned, shrimp, cabbage,
The Shrimp
12 Peeled & Deveined Shrimp
3 Thin Sliced Garlic Cloves
½ Cup White Wine
1 T Lemon Juice
¼ Cup Olive Oil
1 T Butter
Salt/ Pepper/ Chili Flakes
The Slaw
1 Bulb Shaved Fennel
2 Carrots Shredded
½ Cup Shredded Cabbage
½ Red Onion, Thinly Sliced
¼ Thin Sliced Caper Berries (or capers)
2 T Lemon Zest
2 T Chopped Dill
1 tsp Celery Salt
1 T Dijon Mustard
2 T Olive Oil
3 T White Wine Vinegar
Salt/ Pepper/ Sugar to taste
The Shrimp: In sauté pan, heat olive oil and add sliced garlic, season shrimp with salt and pepper and place into sauté pan. As shrimp starts to turn a light pink color, add white wine. Allow white wine to reduce. Continue to sauté shrimp and add lemon juice. Remove pan form heat and finish by adding butter, that will slowly melt and coat the shrimp.

The Slaw: Combine all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl and marinate for at least 20 minutes prior to serving.

Chef Arnold Mynt, AM/FM


German Red Cabbage
Main Ingredients: red cabbage, apples, onions,
* 1 medium head red cabbage, cored and sliced
* 2 large tart apples, peeled and sliced
* 1 medium sweet onion, sliced and separated into rings
* 1 1/2 cups water
* 1 cup cider vinegar
* 1/2 cup sugar
* 1 tablespoon butter
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 6 whole peppercorns
* 2 whole allspice
* 2 whole cloves
* 1 bay leaf
* 2 teaspoons cornstarch
* 2 teaspoons cold water
1. In a Dutch oven, toss cabbage, apples and onion. Add water, vinegar, sugar, butter and salt. Place the peppercorns, allspice, cloves and bay leaf on a double thickness of cheesecloth; bring up corners of cloth and stir with kitchen string to form a bag. Add to Dutch oven. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1-1/4 hours.
2. Discard spice bag. In a small bowl, combin e cornstarch and cold water until smooth; stir in cabbage mixture. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1-2 minutes or until thickened.


Real Food Farms, Franklin, TN


Healing Cabbage Soup
Main Ingredients: cabbage
*1 box chicken or vegetable stock/broth

*4 stalks of celery

*6 carrots

*1 onion

*3 cloves of garlic (more or less to taste)

*1 medium cabbage
This soup can be made vegan/vegetarian by replacing chicken broth/stock with vegetable.A wonderful soup that provides immune support, cold relief, and simply delicious anytime!

Chop all ingredients to size you like. Add all ingredients to a large pot over high heat. Boil & then reduce temperature to slow simmer for 1 1/2 hours.

Additional options: using oilive oil, salt & pepper, diced tomatoes, reducing the liquid content to make a thicker broth to be served over rice or pasta.

Nashville Farmers Market


Healing Cabbage Soup
Main Ingredients: cabbage

1 box chicken or vegetable stock/broth
4 stalks of celery
6 carrots
1 onion
3 cloves of garlic (more or less to taste)
1 medium cabbage
This soup can be made vegan/vegetarian by replacing chicken broth/stock with vegetable.A wonderful soup that provides immune support, cold relief, and simply delicious anytime!

Chop all ingredients to size you like. Add all ingredients to a large pot over high heat. Boil & then reduce temperature to slow simmer for 1 1/2 hours.

Additional options: using oilive oil, salt & pepper, diced tomatoes, reducing the liquid content to make a thicker broth to be served over rice or pasta.

Nashville Farmers Market


Marion's Summer Cabbage Salad
Main Ingredients: cabbage, green onions, cilantro, cider vinegar, hot sweet mustard, honey, garlic
1 green cabbage, cleaned and chopped fine
4 to 5 bundles of chopped green onions
4 to 5 bundles chopped cilantro (and here a tip I got from professional chef
and friend Emmalyn: cut the stems off the cilantro while it's still bundled,
then wash well, pat dry and put into bowl and chop with scissors! Much
easier then any other way).

Dressing:
1 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup light vegetable oil (canola or grapeseed)
1 small jar hot sweet mustard
Equal amount of honey
5 to 6 cloves of fresh crushed garlic
salt and pepper to taste
Marion's family's favorite!

You want to achieve the following proportions:
50% cabbage
25% cilantro
25% green onions.

Toss dry roasted peanuts on top, amount to taste. Just to give it some
crunch.

These amounts should feed 10 to 12 people as a side dish.

Marion Renk Rosenthal, Corona del Mar, CA


Sauerkraut
Main Ingredients: cabbage, sea salt,
Ingredients (for 1 gallon):
5 pounds cabbage
3 tablespoons sea salt
Timeframe: 1-4 weeks (or more)

Special Equipment:
Ceramic crock or food-grade plastic bucket, one-gallon capacity or greater
Plate that fits inside crock or bucket
One-gallon jug filled with water (or a scrubbed and boiled rock)
Cloth cover (like a pillowcase or towel)

Process:
1.Chop or grate cabbage, finely or coarsely, with or without hearts, however you like it. I love to mix green and red cabbage to end up with bright pink kraut. Place cabbage in a large bowl as you chop it.
2.Sprinkle salt on the cabbage as you go. The salt pulls water out of the cabbage (through osmosis), and this creates the brine in which the cabbage can ferment and sour without rotting. The salt also has the effect of keeping the cabbage crunchy, by inhibiting organisms and enzymes that soften it. 3 tablespoons of salt is a rough guideline for 5 pounds of cabbage. I never measure the salt; I just shake some on after I chop up each cabbage. I use more salt in summer, less in winter.
3.Add other vegetables. Grate carrots for a coleslaw-like kraut. Other vegetables I’ve added include onions, garlic, seaweed, greens, Brussels sprouts, small whole heads of cabbage, turnips, beets, and burdock roots. You can also add fruits (apples, whole or sliced, are classic), and herbs and spices (caraway seeds, dill seeds, celery seeds, and juniper berries are classic, but anything you like will work). Experiment.
4.Mix ingredients together and pack into crock. Pack just a bit into the crock at a time and tamp it down hard using your fists or any (other) sturdy kitchen implement. The tamping packs the kraut tight in the crock and helps force water out of the cabbage.
5.5. Cover kraut with a plate or some other lid that fits snugly inside the crock. Place a clean weight (a glass jug filled with water) on the cover. This weight is to force water out of the cabbage and then keep the cabbage submerged under the brine. Cover the whole thing with a cloth to keep dust and flies out.
6.Press down on the weight to add pressure to the cabbage and help force water out of it. Continue doing this periodically (as often as you think of it, every few hours), until the brine rises above the cover. This can take up to about 24 hours, as the salt draws water out of the cabbage slowly. Some cabbage, particularly if it is old, simply contains less water. If the brine does not rise above the plate level by the next day, add enough salt water to bring the brine level above the plate. Add about a teaspoon of salt to a cup of water and stir until it’s completely dissolved.
7.Leave the crock to ferment. I generally store the crock in an unobtrusive corner of the kitchen where I won’t forget about it, but where it won’t be in anybody’s way. You could also store it in a cool basement if you want a slower fermentation that will preserve for longer.
8.Check the kraut every day or two. The volume reduces as the fermentation proceeds. Sometimes mold appears on the surface. Many books refer to this mold as “scum,” but I prefer to think of it as a bloom. Skim what you can off of the surface; it will break up and you will probably not be able to remove all of it. Don’t worry about this. It’s just a surface phenomenon, a result of contact with the air. The kraut itself is under the anaerobic protection of the brine. Rinse off the plate and the weight. Taste the kraut. Generally it starts to be tangy after a few days, and the taste gets stronger as time passes. In the cool temperatures of a cellar in winter, kraut can keep improving for months and months. In the summer or in a heated room, its life cycle is more rapid. Eventually it becomes soft and the flavor turns less pleasant.
9.Enjoy. I generally scoop out a bowl- or jarful at a time and keep it in the fridge. I start when the kraut is young and enjoy its evolving flavor over the course of a few weeks. Try the sauerkraut juice that will be left in the bowl after the kraut is eaten. Sauerkraut juice is a rare delicacy and unparalleled digestive tonic. Each time you scoop some kraut out of the crock, you have to repack it carefully. Make sure the kraut is packed tight in the crock, the surface is level, and the cover and weight are clean. Sometimes brine evaporates, so if the kraut is not submerged below brine just add salted water as necessary. Some people preserve kraut by canning and heat-processing it. This can be done; but so much of the power of sauerkraut is its aliveness that I wonder: Why kill it?
10.Develop a rhythm. I try to start a new batch before the previous batch runs out. I remove the remaining kraut from the crock, repack it with fresh salted cabbage, then pour the old kraut and its juices over the new kraut. This gives the new batch a boost with an active culture starter.

Sandor Katz, from his book Wild Fermentation


Sauerkraut
Main Ingredients: cabbage, carrots, onions, garlic, seaweed, greens, Brussels sprouts, turnips, beets, burdock roots
Timeframe: 1-4 weeks (or more)

Special Equipment:

Ceramic crock or food-grade plastic bucket, one-gallon capacity or greater
Plate that fits inside crock or bucket
One-gallon jug filled with water (or a scrubbed and boiled rock)
Cloth cover (like a pillowcase or towel)

Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

5 pounds cabbage
3 tablespoons sea salt
Process:

1.Chop or grate cabbage, finely or coarsely, with or without hearts, however you like it. I love to mix green and red cabbage to end up with bright pink kraut. Place cabbage in a large bowl as you chop it.

2.Sprinkle salt on the cabbage as you go. The salt pulls water out of the cabbage (through osmosis), and this creates the brine in which the cabbage can ferment and sour without rotting. The salt also has the effect of keeping the cabbage crunchy, by inhibiting organisms and enzymes that soften it. 3 tablespoons of salt is a rough guideline for 5 pounds of cabbage. I never measure the salt; I just shake some on after I chop up each cabbage. I use more salt in summer, less in winter.

3.Add other vegetables. Grate carrots for a coleslaw-like kraut. Other vegetables I've added include onions, garlic, seaweed, greens, Brussels sprouts, small whole heads of cabbage, turnips, beets, and burdock roots. You can also add fruits (apples, whole or sliced, are classic), and herbs and spices (caraway seeds, dill seeds, celery seeds, and juniper berries are classic, but anything you like will work). Experiment.

4.Mix ingredients together and pack into crock. Pack just a bit into the crock at a time and tamp it down hard using your fists or any (other) sturdy kitchen implement. The tamping packs the kraut tight in the crock and helps force water out of the cabbage.

5. Cover kraut with a plate or some other lid that fits snugly inside the crock. Place a clean weight (a glass jug filled with water) on the cover. This weight is to force water out of the cabbage and then keep the cabbage submerged under the brine. Cover the whole thing with a cloth to keep dust and flies out.

6.Press down on the weight to add pressure to the cabbage and help force water out of it. Continue doing this periodically (as often as you think of it, every few hours), until the brine rises above the cover. This can take up to about 24 hours, as the salt draws water out of the cabbage slowly. Some cabbage, particularly if it is old, simply contains less water. If the brine does not rise above the plate level by the next day, add enough salt water to bring the brine level above the plate. Add about a teaspoon of salt to a cup of water and stir until it's completely dissolved.

7.Leave the crock to ferment. I generally store the crock in an unobtrusive corner of the kitchen where I won't forget about it, but where it won't be in anybody's way. You could also store it in a cool basement if you want a slower fermentation that will preserve for longer.

8.Check the kraut every day or two. The volume reduces as the fermentation proceeds. Sometimes mold appears on the surface. Many books refer to this mold as "scum," but I prefer to think of it as a bloom. Skim what you can off of the surface; it will break up and you will probably not be able to remove all of it. Don't worry about this. It's just a surface phenomenon, a result of contact with the air. The kraut itself is under the anaerobic protection of the brine. Rinse off the plate and the weight. Taste the kraut. Generally it starts to be tangy after a few days, and the taste gets stronger as time passes. In the cool temperatures of a cellar in winter, kraut can keep improving for months and months. In the summer or in a heated room, its life cycle is more rapid. Eventually it becomes soft and the flavor turns less pleasant.

9.Enjoy. I generally scoop out a bowl- or jarful at a time and keep it in the fridge. I start when the kraut is young and enjoy its evolving flavor over the course of a few weeks. Try the sauerkraut juice that will be left in the bowl after the kraut is eaten. Sauerkraut juice is a rare delicacy and unparalleled digestive tonic. Each time you scoop some kraut out of the crock, you have to repack it carefully. Make sure the kraut is packed tight in the crock, the surface is level, and the cover and weight are clean. Sometimes brine evaporates, so if the kraut is not submerged below brine just add salted water as necessary. Some people preserve kraut by canning and heat-processing it. This can be done; but so much of the power of sauerkraut is its aliveness that I wonder: Why kill it?

10.Develop a rhythm. I try to start a new batch before the previous batch runs out. I remove the remaining kraut from the crock, repack it with fresh salted cabbage, then pour the old kraut and its juices over the new kraut. This gives the new batch a boost with an active culture starter.

Sandor Katz


Shrimp Slaw
Main Ingredients: Shrimp, Garlic Cloves, White Wine, Lemon Juice, Olive Oil, Butter, Salt/ Pepper/ Chili Flakes, Fennel, Carrots, Cabbage, Red Onion, Caper Berries, Lemon Zest, Dill, celery Salt, dijon Mustard, White Wine Vinegar, Salt/ Pepper/ Sugar to taste
* 12 Peeled & Deveined Shrimp
*

3 Thin Sliced Garlic Cloves
*

½ Cup White Wine
*

1 T Lemon Juice
*

¼ Cup Olive Oil
*

1 T Butter
*

Salt/ Pepper/ Chili Flakes

The Slaw:

* 1 Bulb Shaved Fennel
*

2 Carrots Shredded
*

½ Cup Shredded Cabbage
*

½ Red Onion, Thinly Sliced
*

¼ Thin Sliced Caper Berries (or capers)
*

2 T Lemon Zest
*

2 T Chopped Dill
*

1 tsp Celery Salt
*

1 T Dijon Mustard
*

2 T Olive Oil
*

3 T White Wine Vinegar
*

Salt/ Pepper/ Sugar to taste
The Shrimp: In sauté pan, heat olive oil and add sliced garlic, season shrimp with salt and pepper and place into sauté pan. As shrimp starts to turn a light pink color, add white wine. Allow white wine to reduce. Continue to sauté shrimp and add lemon juice. Remove pan form heat and finish by adding butter, that will slowly melt and coat the shrimp.

The Slaw: Combine all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl and marinate for at least 20 minutes prior to serving.

AM&FM's Arnold Mynt


Two Apples A Day Slaw
Main Ingredients: cabbage, carrots, beets, red onion, apples, mayonnaise, yogurt, cider vinegar, honey, salt, pepper
6 c of thinly sliced cabbage
3/4 c of coarsely shredded carrots
3/4 c of coarsely shredded raw beets
1/4 c of finely chopped red onions
2 small shredded apples
6 tbls mayonnaise
1/4 c plain yogurt
1 1/2 tblsp honey
salt and pepper to taste
In a large bowl, combine cabbage, carrots, beets, onions and apples. To prepared the dressing, in another bowl whisk together mayonnaise, yogurt, vinegar and honey. Pour over vegetables and toss until well mixed. Season with salt and pepper.

Roben Mounger, Columbia, TN


Unstuffed Cabbage Roll Casserole
Main Ingredients: cabbage, butter, ground beef, onion, chopped, cooked brown rice, tomato sauce, white vinegar, sugar, Salt & Pepper to taste
1 head of cabbage

2 tablespoons butter

1 lb ground beef

1/2 onion, chopped

1 1/2 cups cooked brown rice

2 cups tomato sauce

4 tblspns white vinegar

4 tspns sugar

Salt & Pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 325.

Blanch the cabbage in a large pot of salted water. Drain & chop into pieces to yield approx. 3 cups.

Heat the butter in a med. frying pan. Add the ground beef. When the beef is nearly cooked through, add the onion. Continue cooking until the onion is tender. Drain any excess fat from the pan.

Stir in the salt, pepper, rice, tomato sauce, white vinegar, and sugar. Cook for a few minutes to heat through.

Line the bottom of a casserole dish with the chopped cabbage. Pour the ground beef mixture on top. Bake for 1-1.5 hours, until the cabbage is tender.

Serve warm & enjoy!

Grow Local Kitchen, Nashville Farmers Market


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